Medicine

Dog disease that can be passed to humans confirmed in Iowa

Dog disease that can be passed to humans confirmed in Iowa

"Multiple cases" of a bacterial disease that can be spread from dogs to humans have been confirmed in Iowa, according to health officials.

Heinz said the most hard thing about this disease is dogs can't get rid of it like humans can and usually have to be put down to prevent the spread to other dogs or humans.

"We are in the process of notifying the individuals who have custody of the exposed dogs", a Friday news release from the Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship reads. Both the dogs and the facilities will be quarantined while the infected canines undergo clinical testing.

In humans, brucellosis can cause vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, and fever among other things.

Dogs affected by canine Brucellosis often suffer from infertility, stillbirths, and even spontaneous abortions, according to the public health department. The common site of occurrence of this infection is at the breeders and it is not usually seen in households. AHeinz57 Pet Rescue and Transport said a dog breeder in Knoxville, Iowa had pets that tested positive for the infection.

If pet owners have recently acquired a new, small breed dog from Marion County, they should contact their veterinarian. "Other signs can include inflammation of lymph nodes, behavioral abnormalities, lethargy, and weight loss". "The bacteria can also be found in the milk, blood, and semen of infected dogs".

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Brucellosis infection can result in death, though it is extremely rare.

These include recurrent fevers, arthritis, or chronic fatigue. "They don't know what they're getting. Rarely, cases of brucellosis can involve the nervous system, eyes, or heart", reports the Center for Food Security and Public Health. All areas exposed to infected dogs need to be properly cleaned and disinfected, they add.

Heinz said all of the dogs in the rescue's care tested negative for the disease in the first round of tests.

At present no treatment provides complete cure from the infection and antibiotics are used to control the infection and prevent its spread. While the disease primarily affects dogs, it can also be transmitted to humans.

In a statement from the department, officials note the cases of Canine Brucellosis - zoonotic bacterial disease - originated "from a small dog commercial breeding facility in Marion County, Iowa". They recommend hand washing after pet handling as an effort to "practice good biosecurity".