Economy

Facebook, Instagram explain massive outage, apologize for inconvenience

Facebook, Instagram explain massive outage, apologize for inconvenience

Despite some early online rumors that the outages were the result of a distributed denial-of-service (DDos) attack - a type of hack in which attackers flood a company's network - Facebook said in another tweet that "the issue is not related to a DDoS attack".

After acknowledging the problem Wednesday, Facebook remained mum on the issue for almost 24 hours before issuing an explanation and apology around 1630 GMT Thursday. "We are 100 percent back up and running and apologize for any inconvenience", a Facebook spokesperson said. The hashtag #FacebookDown and #InstagramDown were trending on Twitter for much of the day.

In some cases, the apps could be accessed but would not load posts or handle messages.

Downdetector.com, a crowd-sourcing site that tracks internet outages, showed a concentration of Facebook outages in the northeast as of Thursday morning.

"This morning, Pavel Durov, the founder and CEO of the popular instant messaging service Telegram, used his official channel to welcome 3 million new users, he wrote: "I see 3 million new users signed up for Telegram within the last 24 hours", adding" Good. Reuters was not immediately able to verify those claims and the company declined to comment beyond the statement on resumption of services.

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A Hallmark Channel spokeswoman said the network hasn't decided what effect, if any, her arrest will have on programming. Prosecutors said it was up to the universities to decide what to do with students admitted through cheating.

According to the report, a grand jury in NY has subpoenaed information from at least two major smartphone makers about such arrangements with Facebook.

Facebook is facing a slew of lawsuits and regulatory inquiries over its privacy practices, including ongoing investigations by the U.S. Federal Trade Commission, the Securities and Exchange Commission and two state agencies in NY.

Users reported problems Wednesday with posting and updating their social media accounts. "We've provided public testimony, answered questions and pledged that we will continue to do so".

Regulators, and now prosecutors, appear intent on determining whether this was done in ways that let users know what was happening and protected privacy. It's believed to be the biggest interruption ever suffered by the social network.