Economy

Trump Expected to Ban Chinese Telecom Equipment From US Networks

Trump Expected to Ban Chinese Telecom Equipment From US Networks

Sometime in the next few weeks, Donald Trump is expected to sign an executive order that would ban equipment made by Chinese telecoms from USA wireless networks, sources told Politico.

The president will sign an executive order instituting the ban before MWC19 in Barcelona later month, Politico says, citing unnamed sources.

In Germany, Reuters said ministers have been meeting to discuss the possibility of a Huawei 5G ban after Angela Merkel earlier this week set conditions for the company's participation in the nation's new mobile network, including guarantees from the company that it would not hand over information to the Chinese government.

An industry source said there was a "big push" to get the order signed before MWC.

The new legislation was a last-minute addition by the government to a wide-ranging corporate law and would have required telecom operators to seek formal approval for the use of certain kinds of equipment considered to be particularly sensitive for spying or sabotage risks.

Nevertheless, US officials are anxious that China could one day compel Huawei to eavesdrop on its customers.

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A suicidal Roy, with Carter's goading, climbed back into his carbon-monoxide filled truck after stepping out, and ultimately died. The Massachusetts branch of the American Civil Liberties Union also raised free speech concerns.

Huawei has suggested that European Union supervisors oversee the company's cybersecurity practices in order to help convince the western world that it is not helping the Chinese government spy on other countries.

Huawei has since committed to spending $2 billion in a drive to fix those problems, but in a letter to lawmakers last week, Ryan Ding, president of the company's carrier business group, said it would take up to five years to see results.

On top of all this, the U.S. recently uncovered evidence of Huawei trying to commit fraud and intellectual property theft.

Separately the US Justice Department has charged Huawei with conspiring to violate US sanctions on Iran and with stealing robotic technology from T-Mobile US.

Huawei has been under great scrutiny in recent times, but remember that ZTE was also heavily put under the microscope not long before. But Trump's executive order might spark a response from the Chinese government, which is now locked in trade negotiations with the White House. And German media reports that that country's government is also not keen to implement a full ban. Germany's Deutsche Telekom AG has warned that Europe would fall behind the U.S. and China in 5G with such a move, according to people familiar with an internal briefing paper from the company. The Chinese vendor now has the largest market share of the telecommunications equipment market at 28 percent, ahead of Nokia, Ericsson, and Cisco, according to research firm Dell'Oro Group.