Sci-tech

China Unveils World’s First AI News Anchor That Looks Like Human

China Unveils World’s First AI News Anchor That Looks Like Human

Xinhua's AI anchors are doing their thing on selected distribution channels including the news agency's English and Chinese apps, WeChat public account, TV webpage, and two Weibo accounts.

At first glance, the "anchor" appears to be an ordinary looking man, with the voice, facial expressions and movements of a real person.

Xinhua, China's state-run press agency, has created two virtual "composite anchors" that use artificial intelligence to read the news, the South China Morning Post reports.

"I will work tirelessly to keep you informed as texts will be typed into my system uninterrupted", "he" said in a monotonic voice as part of an introductory video.

According to the, an English-language anchor and a Chinese-language anchor were created by Xinhua in partnership with local Beijing search engine company Sogou.

How Man City 'deceived' Uefa over FFP regulations
When asked about the accusations, the manager Pep Guardiola insisted that City had always tried to do things the right way. According to Der Spiegel , the deal was a "closed payment loop", which allowed Manchester City to hide the expenditure.

"I look forward to bringing you the brand new news experiences".

Xinhua used the footage of human anchors as the base layer and then animated the facial features to make it a talking AI.

The agency says that each of these artificially intelligent anchors can work 24×7 for the website and thus reduce news production costs by improving efficiency. Its limited range of motion and expressions becomes repetitive after a short time, while its gray crisp suit and perfectly coiffed hair are even more rigid than human cable news hosts.

He explained: "It's quite hard to watch for more than a few minutes".

THE RISE OF THE MACHINES will be televised if China's artificial intelligence (AI) news presenter is anything to go by. China's news outlets are already subject to a lot of state control and censorship, so the ability to have virtual news readers to effectively do exactly what it's told is certainly an eyebrow-raising concept.