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Two Sets of Remains from North Korea ID'd as US Soldiers

Two Sets of Remains from North Korea ID'd as US Soldiers

According to recent reports, on Monday, the USA military agency leading the analysis on bodies have confirmed that they have identified the remains of the first two American troops which were mixed together with other 55 boxes of other countries human remains which were obtained from the 1950 to 1953 Korean War which were handed over by the North Korea in the beginning of July.

The U.S. service members were killed decades ago while fighting in the Korean War.

Richard Downes, whose father, Air Force Lt. Hal Downes, is among the Korean War missing, said this turnover of remains, having drawn worldwide attention, has the potential to put the USA back on track to finding and eventually identifying many more.

Forensic anthropologists are combing through the remains at a secure facility on Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam. One of the deceased is presumed to be African-American.

Reuters reported that remains from the two identified troops are believed to have been recovered from a battle near the Chongchon River. Of those, around 5,300 American casualties are still believed to be in North Korea. They have thus far analyzed DNA from about half of the boxes, with some remains in better condition than others.

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North Korea provided the 55 boxes in a delayed fulfillment of a commitment its leader, Kim Jong Un, made to President Trump at their Singapore summit on June 12.

Other tables included personal objects from soldiers that don't have any identification on them, including buttons, canteens and old boots.

The United States and North Korea conducted joint searches for remains from 1996 until 2005, when Washington halted the operations citing concerns about the safety of its personnel as Pyongyang stepped up its nuclear program.

On Monday, the Pentagon said United Nations military officials met with North Korean counterparts last week to discuss the repatriation of additional remains.