Medicine

India says it has contained Nipah virus

India says it has contained Nipah virus

Some common signs and symptoms of are headache, fever, nausea, dizziness, drowsiness, neck stiffness and mental confusion. There is no cure known yet, and patients are only given supportive care.

Nipah can be spread by fruit bats, pigs and through human-to-human contact.

A nurse who treated one of Moosa's sons also died, leaving a heart-wrenching note for her family. "Sorry", Lini Puthusheri wrote her husband in a tangle of English and Malayalam, the main language of the south Indian state of Kerala.

On one hand, the central government team that surveyed the area in Kerala from where the outbreak was reported first ascertained that the bats found in the locality are not fruit-eating bats. The blood samples of Muhammed Sabith, who died first in Changaroth were not sent for examination. The report is expected on Friday.

Officials at the primary health centre (PHC) confirmed that no steps had been taken to provide quarantine treatment for the immediate relatives of Moosa, though they raised it at the district medical officer (DMO) level.

It's believed that a nurse treating the victims in Kerala has also died. The letter read "Sajeesh Etta, I am nearly on the way". I don't think I will be able to see you. So we have the responsibility to take care of her family. "Lots of love", she wrote. She added that the department is carrying out effective preventive measures to check the spread of the virus.

First day without death after Nipah virus confirmed in Kozhikode
Umap said orders have been issued across the state to keep a sharp watch for any symptoms of the virus in the animals. The anganwadis in these regions too, have been asked to close down to avoid the spread of the virus among children.

The health situation in Kerala has been brought under control by the state government, by not allowing the virus infection from spreading to more locations.

Union Health Minister JP Nadda discussed the matter with Kerala Health Minister KK Shailaja, and asked citizens not to panic or spread rumours, Doordarshan reported.

Today the death toll of the virus - which has no vaccine - rose to 11, with nearly 100 people being treated as potential cases. In an advisory issued by Health Secretary Rajeev Sadanandan, it was stated that travelling to any part of Kerala was safe. Many have left their homes and have proceeded to kin's residences at distant locations as the Nipah fever have already claimed 11 lives in Kozhikode and adjoining Malappuram district.

The world's second most populous country suffers hundreds of deaths from infectious diseases every year because of weak disease surveillance and infection control systems, leading health experts to worry about the risks of such outbreaks.

In Bangladesh in 2004, humans became infected with NiV as a result of consuming date palm sap that had been contaminated by infected fruit bats.